Floor Plans Made Easy

Decorating an entire home or even just one room involves coordinating way too many details to keep in your head. A good plan is crucial to the success of your project. Planning as much as you can on paper will save time and trouble, and floor plans are the best way to plot your strategy. They don’t have to be complex, even a simple floor plan on graph paper will help you greatly, and the time involved will save you overall. Floor plan graph paper

How a Floor Plan Works:

  • Having a floor plan is like having a map. Once you have your map you can take all the time you need to complete your project.
  • A floor plan “map” will tell you where you are now: the size of the room, the size of any pieces you already own, and what sizes you need to find to make it all work together.
  • Your floor plan will tell you how much space you have for walking around, what size of table will work and where your outlets and windows are so that you don’t make the mistake of putting things where they won’t function correctly.

Case in point: I have a tiny townhouse and my living room window which is covered in shutters takes up one whole wall of my space and I only have two walls! So I made a “mistake” on purpose with the help of my floor plan which showed me that the chairs and table I wanted would keep me from being able to open my shutter slats and window. So I made a Personal Space judgement call and went with the plan I loved anyway and choose to add the accessory of a lovely 18” acrylic wand I keep on the table to prop open my shutter slats. Instead of opening the window for fresh air I open the screened front door which is on the same wall.  But I must tell you I really puzzled over this a while before I purchased my new pieces. Luckily I had the floor plan to do this with before I invested thousands of dollars in new furniture.

Super Simple Floor Plan Creation:

  • Graph paper is your best friend. That plus a clip board, pencil with a good eraser and of course a steel tape measure is all you need. Each square of the paper can equal what you want but generally it is a 1 foot measure. If you want a larger sketch you can make it a 2 foot measure. Just jot down at the top of your floor plan “map” what measurement you went with.
  • When you use the graph paper to outline the space of your room (only one room per page unless they are connected like a Great Room) and you count the squares to equal the feet, you can guess as to the inches. Half a square is 6” and so on but be sure to write along the margins what the exact measurements are.
  • Decorating the wall space with items like book cases or wall units requires a few more details; you need to consider the door molding and window opening and the outlets location because each inch counts with these items of furniture.
  • Leave 3’ (36 inches) of space for the main traffic path. Draw a line to show where you expect your traffic flow to occur such as moving from room to room. Usually you can tell what this will be by connecting the entrances to your rooms with a traffic line you draw on your map.
  • Leave 15-18” of space between the sofa or chairs and the coffee table in front of them so you can get in and sit down.
  • The dining room chairs need 3′ (36”) behind them so you can scoot in and out. Measure your selected table and add the 3′ all around your table size and you will know if you have the best size.
  • Remember the amount of space you leave between your furniture is just as vital to the whole room working correctly as the items you fill your room with.

I hope these little tips help. If you want more check out this link to my website.

‘till next time,
Ginger-Marie
Your Personal Space Coach

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